18th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 3-5, 2019 • Chicago, IL

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Native American Hearing Education and Training Initiative

A 2017 Needs Assessment conducted in NE KS Tribal communities showed a lack of resources in education and training pertaining to hearing health and the impact early hearing loss can have on child development (Allison-Burbank, 2017). Native American children are five times more likely to develop speech, language and hearing disorders (Friedland, 1993). In addition, Native American children ages one-four are 1.5 times more likely to have Otitis Media (Curns et al, 2002). These delays can result in a lack of school readiness due to developmental delays that can be caused by hearing loss. In response, it is essential to improve the hearing service timeline beginning with prenatal care through early education. This will be accomplished by providing health promotion, early intervention education, and training to community healthcare providers. Promoting hearing health starts with creating awareness by speaking at local community events. The goal of early intervention education is to teach parents, providers and the wider community about birth to three early intervention services and connect people with resources to address these needs. Creating sustainable hearing care in the tribal communities begins with training local providers on the appropriate hearing screening techniques including referral and follow-up protocols. Community education will be tailored by creating a culturally appropriate audiogram that displays environmental sounds and correlating speech banana. These efforts will contribute to the Healthy Kansans 2020 Plan that aims at improving overall health and wellbeing for those in Kansas. In conclusion, the research question at hand is: will the Hearing Education and Training Initiative, associated with a regional developmental disabilities improvement plan, create more sustainable hearing practices in NE KS tribal communities?

  • To identify and treat hearing loss in Native American children.
  • Educating and training families and healthcare providers in NE KS tribal communities on the importance of hearing health.
  • Contributing to the Healthy Kansans 2020 Plan that improves overall health and wellbeing for those in Kansas.

Presentation:
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Transcripts:
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Presenters/Authors

Chloe Pfeifer (), University of Kansas , c439p507@kumc.edu;
I am Chloe Pfeifer and currently in my second year of my Au.D. at The University of Kansas Medical Center. I am also a LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities) Trainee. This traineeship has given me the opportunity to gain experience in a variety of settings with a multitude of disciplines. One area I am passionate about is working with medically underserved communities.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Mary Franke (), University of Kansas Medical Center, m674f837@kumc.edu;
My name is Mary Franke. I am studying social work and will obtain my Masters Degree in May. I am currently a LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities) Trainee. I am passionate about working on an interdisciplinary team in order to advance the health and wellness of people with developmental disabilities. I hope to respond to needs in communities in order to enhance the quality of life for all. I am dedicated to working with audiologists in order to improve the health of Native American Children in NE Kansas.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.