18th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 3-5, 2019 • Chicago, IL

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3/09/2020  |   2:30 PM - 3:00 PM   |  Fostering JOY in Families with Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing   |  Chicago A

Fostering JOY in Families with Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing share many common experiences. The support that has been offered to parents has often been in the form of helping them to grow their child’s language skills or develop understanding of the child’s audiologic, communicative and developmental needs. Despite the importance of these, we argue for the need for professionals and parents themselves to focus on fostering joy involved in raising children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Rather than emphasize parental stress or challenges, in this session we will: 1. Contextualize the parenting experience in terms of strengths, such as maternal insightfulness (Feniger-Schaal, Oppenheim, & Koren-Karie, 2019), parental increases in confidence and ability to find meaning in life in parents raising children with disabilities (Beighton & Wills, 2017), and parents’ positive appraisals of the influence that raising a deaf or hard of hearing child has had on their lives (Szarkowski & Brice, 2016). 2. Provide Tip Sheets developed by the authors for direct use by or with parents. These Tip Sheets offer suggestions for living in the moment, honing in on the positive aspects of the parenting experience, and celebrating the “little victories” in raising a child. 3. Describe the role of Joy Ambassadors and seek audience feedback regarding how to further the Joy Movement.

  • 1. Compare and contrast typical results obtained from “traditional” research focusing on the experience of parents of children with disabilities and “strengths based” research that explores the benefits and positive attributes of parenting children with disabilities or children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • 2. Review the Tip Sheets and generate a minimum of two ideas for how to put one of the suggestions into action in his/her own context as a parent or a professional.
  • 3. Articulate, in their own words, the “Joy Movement” and the potential impact it might have on families.

Presentation:
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Transcripts:
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Presenters/Authors

Amy Szarkowski (), LEND, Boston Children's Hospital , Amy.Szarkowski@childrens.harvard.edu;
Amy Szarkowski, PhD, is a psychologist who specializes in working with children with reduced hearing and their families. Dr. Szarkowski is on the Core Faculty for LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities), at Boston Children's Hospital. Through LEND, she teaches and advises future leaders in health care about the needs of children with reduced hearing and children with disabilities. Dr. Szarkowski holds an academic appointment as Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She serves as the Clinical Director for the Children's Center for Communication/Beverly School for the Deaf. Dr. Szarkowski is also an adjunct instructor for the Infants, Toddlers and Families (ITF) Interdisciplinary program at Gallaudet University.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
• Receives Salary for Employment from Boston Children's Hospital .

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Candace Lindow-Davies (), Hands & Voices Headquarters, Candace@handsandvoices.org;
Candace Lindow-Davies, Minnesota Hands & Voices, is the mother of a son who is profoundly deaf, and for the past eight plus years, developed and coordinated services for MN Hands & Voices/Guide By Your Side at Lifetrack Resources in Minnesota . For seven years, Candace has also served as a parent consultant for the MN Dept. of Health's Newborn Hearing Screening Program. She also chairs the MN Dept. of Health's Newborn Hearing Screening Advisory Committee, representing parents of children who are deaf and hard of hearing.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Jennifer Clark (), Hawaii Department of Health Early Intervention, Jennifer.Blohm@doh.hawaii.gov;
Jennifer Clark received her Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Disorders and Deaf Studies: Sign Language Interpreting, from California State University, Fresno and her Master’s Degree from Gallaudet University in Deaf Education: Family Centered Early Education. Since 2010, Jennifer has been working with D/HH/DB children (birth-3) as the Early Intervention Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Specialist for the Hawaii Department of Health.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Janet DesGeorges (), Hands & Voices, janet@handsandvoices.org;
Janet DesGeorges lives in Boulder, Colorado and is Executive Director of Hands & Voices Headquarters. Janet has presented to groups worldwide about the experiences of families as they journey through life with a child with deafness or hearing loss. Ms. DesGeorges received a program certificate from the MCH Public Health Leadership Institute in 2011 at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. As an EHDI Systems advocate, Janet believes in the principles and guiding philosophies of Hands & Voices towards a parent-driven, professionally-collaborative approach when supporting families in the early years. Her areas of interest include Leadership Development for parents who participate in systemic improvement; Deaf Education Reform and Improvement; Children’s Safety and Success(preventing child abuse and neglect); Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Systems; and Parent/Professional partnerships in Quality Improvement processes.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Marilyn Sass-Lehrer (), Gallaudet University, marilyn.sass-lehrer@gallaudet.edu;
Marilyn Sass-Lehrer is Professor Emerita at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC. She received a master’s degree in Deaf Education from New York University and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in Early Childhood Education and Curriculum and Instruction. She is an adjunct professor in Gallaudet University's Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Their Families Interdisciplinary Program. She is editor of Early Intervention for Deaf and Hard-of- Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2016), and has several other publications related to early intervention. Dr. Sass-Lehrer is actively involved in professional development and learning for early intervention providers.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.