18th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 3-5, 2019 • Chicago, IL

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  |  Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Hearing Loss in Children with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Hearing Loss in Children with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Approximately 40% of children who are deaf or hard of hearing have one or more co-occurring conditions or disabilities that include autism, intellectual disabilities, social-emotional disorders, sensory integration dysfunction, visual impairment, motor delays, and learning differences. Children with severe cognitive disabilities are particularly challenging to assess and manage in the traditional, center-based audiology clinic because surroundings and service providers are generally unfamiliar to the child.  Furthermore, children with physical disabilities who require motorized wheelchairs and other mobility devices may have needs related to the complexities of travel and the additional costs incurred with transportation to and from the clinic. This presentation will begin with a review of comorbidities that occur with sensorineural hearing loss. We will also review studies showing that hearing loss in this population is often under-identified, and when diagnosed, less aggressively managed. We will conclude by describing a clinical service model that provides hearing screening, audiologic assessment, and related audiology services in the child's school setting, citing both the advantages and challenges associated with this model. A research project aimed at examining these factors in an educational facility for children with severe cognitive disabilities will also be described. Note: The student authors are working under the supervision of faculty in the UNC School of Medicine. Their participation in the project is a component of their training within the North Carolina LEND program (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities).

  • Describe developmental disabilities and comorbidities that occur in children with sensorineural hearing loss.
  • List three factors that complicate hearing screening and audiologic management of children with severe cognitive disabilities in the traditional clinical setting
  • Discuss potential advantages and challenges associated with hearing screening and audiologic management in the educational setting.

Presentation:
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Presenters/Authors

Megan Bartoshuk (), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, megan_bartoshuk@med.unc.edu;
Megan Bartoshuk, B.S. is a full-time graduate student in the Doctor of Audiology (AuD) program in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. She is also an audiology trainee in the North Carolina LEND program (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities) at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Her bachelor's degree in Auditory Science with minors in Neuroscience and Linguistics is from Carnegie Mellon University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Stephanie Berry (), University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill , stephanie_berry@med.unc.edu;
Stephanie Berry, B.A. is a full-time graduate student in the Doctor of Audiology (AuD) program in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. She is also an audiology trainee in the North Carolina LEND program (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Her bachelor's degree in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology with a minor in Speech & Hearing Sciences is from Washington University in St. Louis.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Ashley McMillen (), University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill , ashley_mcmillen@med.unc.edu;
Ashley McMillen, B.A, B.S. is a full-time graduate student in the Doctor of Audiology (AuD) program in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. She is also an audiology trainee in the North Carolina LEND program (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Her bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Communication Sciences are from Thiel College.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Crystal Smaldone (), University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill , crystal_smaldone@med.unc.edu;
Crystal Smaldone, M.S. is a full-time graduate student in the Doctor of Audiology (AuD) program in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. She is also an audiology trainee in the North Carolina LEND program (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Her master's degree in Physiology and Developmental Biology is from Brigham Young University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -