18th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 3-5, 2019 • Chicago, IL

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  |  Findings from Washington State EHDDI Program's Electronic Linkage with Part C Services

Findings from Washington State EHDDI Program's Electronic Linkage with Part C Services

The Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) recommends that infants identified as deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) should be enrolled in early intervention (EI) no later than six months of age. When EI is provided to infants who are D/HH, the likelihood that these children will enter Kindergarten with communication skills on par with their hearing peers increases. In 2014, the Washington State Department of Health Early Hearing Detection, Diagnosis, and Intervention (EHDDI) program created an electronic linkage between the EHDDI Information System (IS) and the Department of Early Learning Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT) Program Data Management System (DMS) Database. The ESIT program administers Washington State’s Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C EI system. Through this electronic linkage, we initially found that just 53% of infants identified as D/HH were enrolled in EI services. Over the past three years, we created program improvements to increase the number of infants linked to EI services in EHDDI-IS and to better understand the EI enrollment status for infants who are D/HH. This presentation will describe our electronic linkage with the ESIT program, the system improvements made, the EI enrollment status of infants who are D/HH in Washington State, and our lessons learned from this work.

  • Explain the WA EHDDI program’s electronic linkage with ESIT.
  • Identify aspects of the electronic linkage that needed improvement.
  • Identify lessons learned by the WA EHDDI program.

Presentation:
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Presenters/Authors

Julie Walker (), WA State Dept. of Health, Julie.Walker@doh.wa.gov;
Julie Walker, MPH, is a follow-up coordinator for the Washington State Department of Health EHDDI Program. She works to ensure that babies who do not have a passing hearing screen receive appropriate follow-up services. She works with hospital hearing screen coordinators, primary care providers, and audiologists to make sure babies who are identified as deaf or hard of hearing are enrolled in early intervention services in a timely manner. Julie received her Master’s in Public from American Public University, and her Bachelor’s degree in Community Health from Western Washington University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Karin Neidt (), Washington State Dept. Of Health, karin.neidt@doh.wa.gov;
Karin Neidt is the Washington State Early Hearing-loss Detection, Diagnosis, and Intervention (EHDDI) Coordinator, implementing and managing the newborn hearing screen follow-up and tracking/surveillance system. Karin previously worked for two years with the Department of Health Newborn Screening Program, consulting health care providers and families in the appropriate follow-up for infants with abnormal screening results. Karin received her Master in Public Health from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, and her Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology from Montana State University in Bozeman, MT.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Marcie Rider (), WA State Department of Health, marcie.rider@doh.wa.gov;
Marcie Rider, AuD, received her doctorate of audiology from the University of Washington. She is a follow-up coordinator for the Washington State Department of Health EHDDI program. She takes part in ensuring that babies who do not receive a hearing scree or do not pass a hearing screen receive appropriate follow-up series. She assists in coordinating care between hospital screening programs, primary care physicians and audiologists so children with hearing loss do not fall through the cracks but instead are provided with the advantages of early identification and intervention.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Salary for Employment from Washignton State Department of Health.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Debra Lochner Doyle (), Washington State Department of Health, Deb.LochnerDoyle@doh.wa.gov;
Ms. Doyle is the State Coordinator for Genetic Services and the manager of the Screening and Genetics Unit for the Washington State Department of Health. She is board certified by both the American Board of Medical Genetics and the American Board of Genetic Counseling. Ms. Doyle received her B.S. in genetics from the University of Washington and her M.S. in human genetics and genetic counseling from Sarah Lawrence College in New York. Before accepting her current position, she held positions at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Research Center, Jone's Institute for Reproductive Medicine, Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, and Women and Infant's Hospital Prenatal Diagnosis Center. Ms. Doyle is a past President of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and is a founding member of the Coalition of State Genetics Coordinators.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -