17th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 18-20, 2018 • Denver, CO

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  |  What Can Newborn Hearing Screening Data Tell Us About Factors Associated with Loss to Follow-Up?

What Can Newborn Hearing Screening Data Tell Us About Factors Associated with Loss to Follow-Up?

Today, newborn hearing screening (NBHS) is widely accepted and its importance and benefits have been recognized worldwide. Although the percentage of infants being screened in the United States (U.S.) has increased dramatically from 38% in 2000 to 95% in 2007 following the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) recommendations, approximately 50% of those who do not pass are not documented as having returned for appropriate follow-up to (a) confirm the hearing loss, (b) be fit with hearing technology, or (c) receive additional intervention. These infants are referred to as “lost to follow-up”. In general, children with congenital hearing loss who receive early intervention have better outcomes than those who are diagnosed later in life. Therefore, it is essential that infants who do not pass their newborn hearing screening receive follow-up diagnostic testing and appropriate services in a timely manner. The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences (DHSS), Division of Audiology performs screenings in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and well baby nursery (WBN) on approximately 4,500 babies a year. The primary goal of this project was to develop a data repository that would allow for the compilation of infant characteristics and screening data in Vanderbilt’s newborn nurseries and use the data collected for quality monitoring and investigation of possible factors associated with loss to follow up in addition to several other goals such as: 1. development of a REDCap data repository, to include data on patient demographics, screening results, and risk factors for hearing loss; 2. documentation and description of potential factors that might be associated with lost to follow-up, including infant and family demographics; and 3. calculation of the percentage of children receiving intervention less than one month after diagnosis, as recommended by the JCIH and an estimate of the institutional loss to follow-up rate.

  • Creation of a data repository and data management
  • Using data to identify potential factors for loss to follow-up
  • How our data can help us improve referral and follow-up rates

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Presenters/Authors

Anne Marie Tharpe (), Vanderbilt University, anne.m.tharpe@vanderbilt.edu;
Dr. Tharpe is Professor and Chair, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. Her clinical and research interests are in the area of pediatric audiology. Specifically, she is interested in the impact of hearing loss on various aspects of child development, special needs of children with multiple disabilities, and the development and assessment of hearing in infants. Dr. Tharpe has published extensively in national and international professional journals, has published a number of books and book chapters, and has spoken to over 200 audiences around the world on pediatric audiology issues.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Hayden Engstrom (), Vanderbilt University, hayden.g.engstrom@vanderbilt.edu;
Hayden Engstrom is a fourth year AuD student at Vanderbilt University. She is completing her fourth year externship at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in affiliation with the Medical College of Wisconsin, with a focus in cochlear implants. Her primary interest is in pediatric audiology, particularly the areas of early intervention and cochlear implants. She spent over two years conducting newborn hearing screenings as a student technician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and has participated in several newborn hearing screening research projects.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Alyssa Fosnight (), Vanderbilt University, alyssa.m.fosnight@vanderbilt.edu;
Alyssa Fosnight is a fourth year audiology extern at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, specializing in pediatrics. In May 2017, she will graduate with her Doctor of Audiology degree and pursue a career dedicated to improving the lives of children with hearing loss. She is especially interested in diagnostic testing and pediatric hearing aids.Her research interests include appropriate implementation of JCHI's 1-3-6 guidelines in both newborn and neonatal intensive care unit nurseries.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.