20th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 28 - March 2, 2021 • Cincinnati, OH

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 Diagnoses and Interventions Related to Auditory Processing Disorder and Parent/Provider Perceptions

Background: Auditory processing disorder (APD) is a deficit of active listening and is believed to originate in the brain, not the ear (American Academy of Audiology, 2010). APD overlaps with speech-language disorders, attention-deficit disorders, and autism spectrum disorder. There are many debates and discussions between health professionals, including audiologists and speech-language pathologists, on the diagnosis and treatment efficacy for auditory processing disorder (APD) in school-aged children (Fey et al., 2011). Commonly used interventions include computerized trainings such as Fast ForWord and Earobics, and traditional listening treatments such as dichotic listening, language and sound discrimination trainings (Fey et al., 2011; Sharma et al., 2012; Lotfi et al., 2016). Parents and healthcare providers may have differing opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment interventions for patients with APD. Objective: The overall goal of this project is to investigate the range of diagnoses and interventions that have been given in children diagnosed with listening difficulties, known as APD. Our specific questions were What are the types of diagnoses given and interventions used? and What are perceptions of effectiveness of APD Intervention by providers and families?

  • There are many therapies that target functional skills in attention, fine motor skills, language, and sensory processing but few therapies are designed to intervene with auditory skills.
  • To achieve better evidence in this area, we must work across disciplines to investigate ways to approach the multiple needs of children with APD.
  • This project is designed to work with audiology, speech-language, occupational therapy, and psychology to lead change in the approach to APD.

Poster:
21060_13033AlexandraParshall.pdf


Presenter: Alexandra Parshall


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Presenter: Lisa Hunter

Lisa Hunter is Scientific Director of Audiology and Professor at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati. She collaborates on a number of funded studies including evaluating physiologic factors associated with risks for hearing loss and understanding mechanisms for improved follow-up with newborn hearing screening in high risk famlies. She is a faculty with the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Presenter: Sandra Grether

Dr. Grether is a Speech and Language Pathologist who works with children with developmental disabilities. Her expertise is in the field of augmentative and alternative communication.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Presenter: Susan Eichert


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -

Presenter: Olivia Wnek


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -

Presenter: Katie Effler


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -