20th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 28 - March 2, 2021 • Cincinnati, OH

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 Infant Hearing Screening in NICU Level III and IV Nurseries in North Carolina

Infants requiring hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are known to have a higher prevalence of permanent hearing loss than infants with uncomplicated birth histories. The higher prevalence includes increased risk of both cochlear and neural impairment. The recently published Joint Committee on Infant Hearing, Year 2019 Position Statement: Principles and Guidelines for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Programs (JCIH, 2019) reaffirmed the Joint Committee’s earlier position statement (JCIH, 2007) which recommended automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) as the sole hearing technology for screening infants who have received care in the NICU. Also reaffirmed was direct referral to an audiologist for rescreening infants who did not pass the initial hospital-based screen, and if indicated, a comprehensive audiological evaluation including diagnostic ABR (JCIH, 2019). This poster will report the findings of a project undertaken by four LEND audiology doctoral students working in collaboration with the NC-EHDI program, with mentoring provided by UNC faculty and by North Carolina’s Unit Manager for Genetics and Newborn Screening. The primary aim is to assess the current status of hearing screening in the Level III and Level IV NICU nurseries in North Carolina. Data collection will include an electronic (Qualtrix) survey as well as structured interviews with regional audiologists employed by NC-EHDI. Key areas of investigation include selection of screening technology/equipment, calibration and maintenance, protocols for ensuring the competence of screening personnel, communication with the family, linkages to the NC-EHDI program, data entry to the state data base HearingLink, the role of audiology in oversight of the screening program, monitoring of ototoxic medications, and protocols for referral/follow-up of infants who do not pass the initial hearing screening. In addition to sharing the findings for North Carolina we will provide information and resources for replicating this study in other states.

  • Participants will be able to identify the components of a comprehensive NICU hearing screening program
  • Participants will be able to describe the JCIH 2019 recommendations for hearing screening in the NICU
  • Participants will be able to apply resources for evaluating NICU hearing screening practices in their institution or state

Poster:
21060_12978JacksonRoush.pdf


Presenter: Jane Khin


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -

Presenter: Shannon Muzio


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -

Presenter: Stephanie Ortega


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Presenter: Kathryn Sobon


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -

Presenter: Marcia Fort

Dr. Fort is the Genetics and Newborn Screening Unit Manager in the Children and Youth Branch of the North Carolina Division of Public Health and serves as the NC EHDI Coordinator. She has worked with the NC EHDI program since 2002. Dr. Fort has 32 years of experience as a pediatric audiologist in hospital, private practice, ENT office and public school settings.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.

Presenter: Jackson Roush

Dr. Roush is Professor and Director of the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. He also serves as Director of the North Carolina LEND program and is co-chair of the NC EHDI Advisory Board. Dr. Roush has been a pediatric audiologist for 35 years.


ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -
No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial -
No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.