17th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
March 18-20, 2018 • Denver, CO

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  |  A New Day for EHDI in Georgia: Capturing individualized hearing screening data on the newborn screening card and electronic birth certificate, 2014-2016

A New Day for EHDI in Georgia: Capturing individualized hearing screening data on the newborn screening card and electronic birth certificate, 2014-2016

EHDI information systems (EHDI-IS) must individually identify each infant screened for hearing loss. Historically, Georgia’s EHDI-IS captured individualized hearing screening data on fewer than 10% of occurrent births each year. To facilitate reporting of individualized data, hearing screening fields were added to the Georgia electronic birth certificate (EBC) in 2013 and to the newborn screening (NBS) card in 2014. This poster presentation will graphically depict the validity/completeness, accuracy/consistency, and representativeness of hearing screening data reported to Georgia’s EHDI-IS as a result of adding hearing screening fields to those data collection instruments. NBS and EBC records of resident births occurring from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2016 were downloaded from the EHDI-IS to evaluate the following hearing screening fields in each record set: initial screening date, method, and results. Completeness of these fields improved from 0% of NBS records with valid field values in July 2014 to 64% in June 2016, and from 0% of EBC records with valid field values in July 2014 to 86% in June 2016. Using NBS records as the gold standard, accuracy/consistency of these fields improved from 0% of EBC records with field values that matched those in NBS records in July 2014, to 85% in June 2016. Representativeness of all occurrent births improved from 0% in July 2014 to 75% in June 2016 in NBS records, and from 0% in July 2014 to 72% in June 2016 in EBC records. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the NBS card and EBC to capture individualized hearing screening data that other states may find of interest.

  • Identify and define five attributes of an EHDI information system that determine data quality.
  • Describe the use of newborn screening cards and electronic birth certificates to capture individualized newborn hearing screening data.
  • Identify the gold standard when evaluating the accuracy, consistency, and representativeness of newborn hearing screening data.

Presentation:
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Handouts:
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Transcripts:
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Presenters/Authors

Michael Lo (), Georgia Department of Public Health, michael.lo@dph.ga.gov;
Michael Lo is a Child Health Epidemiologist II at the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH). Prior to joining DPH, he was an Injury Epidemiologist at the Florida Department of Health and as a contractor for the U.S. Army Medical Command. He received a B.A. in Biology from Johns Hopkins University and an M.S.P.H. in Epidemiology from the University of South Florida.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Brendan Ibe (), Georgia Department of Public Health, Brendan.Ibe@dph.ga.gov;
A physician by training, Dr. Brendan Ibe is a Child Health Epidemiologist III/Manager at the Georgia Department of Public Health. He also holds academic appointments as Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at New York Medical College and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Johanna Pringle (), Georgia Department of Public Health, Johanna.Pringle@dph.ga.gov;
Johanna Pringle is the Title V Senior Manager at the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH). Prior to this position, she was the Child Health Screening Program Director at DPH. Ms. Pringle received a B.S. in Health Education and an M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences from the University of Florida. In 2016, she received a Young MCH Professional Award from the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP).

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Tiffany Fowles (), Georgia Department of Public Health, Tiffany.Fowles@dph.ga.gov;
Dr. Tiffany Fowles is the Deputy Director of MCH Epidemiology at the Georgia Department of Public Health. She served as the Principal Investigator for Georgia's EHDI information system cooperative agreement with CDC. Dr. Fowles received her doctoral degree from the University of Georgia and M.S.P.H. degree from Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. In 2014, she was selected as one of UGA Alumni Association's 40 Under 40 Class of 2014 honorees.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Kelly Dundon (), Georgia DPH, kelly.dundon@dph.ga.gov;
Kelly Dundon is Georgia’s Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Coordinator. Kelly holds a Master’s in Public Health from Georgia State University, Doctorate of Audiology from the University of Wisconsin and her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science from the University of Colorado. Kelly began her career as a pediatric audiologist at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, which is where she became passionate about early identification of hearing impairment for at risk populations. In 2011, she enrolled in Georgia State University to obtain her Master’s in Public Health and began contracting with Georgia’s Department of Public Health to assist with the EHDI program. Kelly is committed to improving identification of hearing impairment and systems of intervention in Georgia.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.